Austin Corbin II

Inducted 1990

Austin Corbin (1827–1896) was a native of Newport, New Hampshire. He finished Harvard Law School and Practical Law, moving to Iowa in 1851 with his brother. After many land speculations proved profitable, Corbin established a bank but soon became restless and moved to New York to establish the private banking firm of Austin Corbin and Company.

Corbin later hired on at a woodland estate on Long Island where he started his first game farm, quickly finding himself running out of space for his animals. He returned to New Hampshire to establish a park on land around the Croydon and Grantham Mountains. He purchased a total of 60 farms with buildings, acquiring 275 separate deeds. Corbin named his park Blue Mountain Forest and stocked it with three kinds of deer as well as elk, wild boar, moose, caribou, mountain goats, beaver, pheasants and bison.

Corbin died in North Newport in 1896 in a carriage accident caused by a runaway horse. Two years after his death there were 75 bison in the park, but by 1908 Austin Corbin Jr. reported that the park’s herd had now increased to 165. From this stock the younger Corbin contributed to government-sponsored herds in national game preserves in Montana and North Carolina. Other animals were loaned or sold to zoos, as well as to owners of private preserves in New York, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Austin Corbin’s New Hampshire experiment contributed greatly to preserving the American bison from extinction.

Other Inductees

Bruce Anderson

Bruce Anderson

His commitment, service and advocacy played a crucial role in the development of today’s bison industry, particularly in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s when the industry plummeted.

read more
Mary Ann “Molly” Goodnight

Mary Ann “Molly” Goodnight

In May of 1879, when Mary Ann realized the inevitable wiping out of the buffalo, she urged her husband, Charles Goodnight, to attempt to preserve them. He set aside, at her request, 600 acres for the buffalo starting with three calves.

read more

0 Comments